As we have established by now, there are a wide variety of different eCommerce-specific reports included in Google Analytics. It is valuable to be able to understand the data contained in these reports, which is why I’ve taken the time to walk you through them one-by-one.

In this post, we’re going to have a quick look at the Checkout Behavior Report. To be honest I don’t tend to use this one all the time, but it is useful for Conversion Rate Optimisation as it lets you walk through how your visitors are interacting with your checkout form. If you can examine and then improve the ways in which customers behave as they are buying your products and / or services you can make some quick wins in store profit.

The image below shows where the Checkout Behavior Report can be accessed:

The Checkout Behaviour Report is very similar to the Shopping Behaviour Report, however it uses the custom “Check-out Labelling” steps that you may have set if you have turned on Enhanced Ecommerce Tracking, as shown in the image below:

 

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Like I said, I don’t tend to use this report all that often as I’m not usually involved in checkout page optimisation projects. However here is an example of what the report looks like. A completed report would have Step 1, Step 2, Step 3 etc, labelled and quantified.

The intended purpose of going through the steps that I will outline shortly is to identify which step visitors are reaching in the checkout form, and also to determine if there are any sudden drop-offs at a particular checkout step.

Here is an example of possible allocation of steps:

  • Step 1: View the checkout page
  • Step 2: Complete the name and address fields
  • Step 3: Select a shipping option
  • Step 4: Enter a coupon code
  • Step 5: Add credit card, PayPal or Afterpay details
  • Step 6: Click the purchase button

Once this process is complete, you could then view the report to see the absolute number and percentage of sessions reaching each step, the absolute number and percentage of sessions abandoning the form at each step, and the relative percentage of people moving from one step to the next.

While this report is intended to be used with the checkout, there is no reason why you cannot set it up to work with any particular behaviour flow that you wish to track sequentially on your website. The benefit of this, over the Shopping Behaviour Report is that you can track completely custom events. I actually plan to investigate using this report more often as I can see many uses for this report that I haven’t covered here.

There are a variety of ways that these steps can be implemented. But because the checkout steps are completely custom I recommend setting them up with Google Tag Manager rather than using javascript inline tracking codes.

The Checkout Behaviour Report is another valuable tool in your Google Analytics toolbox, and one that can be customised to provide interesting insights. As I said, I don’t tend to use this one much myself, but if you use it with success I’d love to know how it is working for you. Are you primarily using it for checkout step optimisation?

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