The Product Performance Report provides a ton of useful information for your eCommerce store, and you’re definitely going to want to take advantage of it. In this blog post, I will be describing some of the key data that is included in this report, and how you can use it.

You can find the Product Performance Report in the Ecommerce Conversions menu, as depicted below:

In this report you choose either the Summary or the Shopping Behaviour report view. They each have different table columns so I’ll describe them separately. You can choose to view your reports by Product Name, Product SKU, Product Category or Product Brand, depending upon which type of details you have supplied in your product tracking code.

Note: You may not have data for Product Name, Product SKU, Product Category or Product Brand. If you don’t have data it will say (not set) when you select that report view.

You can also choose to include a secondary dimension to your report, which enables you to analyse your product performance by a criteria of your choosing. To analyse further, you can also click on ‘advanced’, and filter the results based on specific criteria

Product Performance – Summary Report

The Summary Report is the reporting view you first see when you open the Product Performance report. It is aimed at helping you to identify the products that are doing the best overall. The Summary Report enables you to discover the following metrics about each product in your product range:

  • Product Revenue: This is the total amount of revenue earned from the specific product during the time period selected.
  • Unique Purchases: This is the total number of transactions involving the specific product during the time period selected.
  • Quantity: This is the quantity of product sold during the time period selected.
  • Price: This is the average price per sale (i.e. revenue divided by quantity) during the time period selected.
  • QTY: This is the average number of items per transaction (i.e. quantity divided by unique purchases) during the time period selected.
  • Product Refund Amount: If you process your refunds into Google Analytics, this column shows you the total revenue refunded during the time period selected. Note: to process your refunds into Google Analytics you will need to write the custom Enhanced Ecommerce Tracking code that processes the refund and sends it to Google Analytics.
  • Cart-to-Detail Rate: This is the percentage of product views that results in the product being added to the shopping cart.
  • Buy-to-Detail Rate: This is the percentage of product views that results in the product being purchased. High Buy-to-Detail Rate items make excellent cross-sells.

This report can give you a real insight into the way the way that the particular products in your store are performing. This can be food for thought with regard to your future retail and eCommerce strategy.

Typically you will find that a handful of your products are generating the majority of your revenue, and the rest is the “long tail”. While you probably already know those top few key performers, it is hard to know which of your long tail products to promote. By looking at your Cart-to-Detail Rate and Buy-to-Detail rate you can see which products are likely to sell well if promoted. With the right secondary dimensions in place, you can drill down to the products that have the highest conversions rates and then look at targeting data such as demographics, marketing channels, campaigns and custom dimensions to devise a strategy for pushing high potential products further up the ranks.

Product Performance – Shopping Behaviour Report

The Shopping Behaviour Report is the alternate view for the Product Performance report. It enables you to see which products are making their way further down the sales funnel. This is useful if you suspect that some products are more likely to be abandoned throughout the sales process than other products; or that low conversion rates is a product-centric problem rather than a problem of your webpage design.

Here are the different columns you get:

  • Product List Views: This is the number of times that the product in question has shown up in a list of products during the time period selected. Product list views include navigating to particular shopping categories, search results, “recommended for you” results, or any other list of products shown anywhere on your website, as long as it triggers a Product Impression action when seen by your visitor.
  • Product Detail Views: This is the number of times that the product has been looked at individually during the time period selected.
  • Product Adds to Cart: This is the number of times that the product has been added to a cart during the time period selected.
  • Product Removes From Cart: This is the number of times that the product has been removed from a shopping cart during the time period selected.
  • Product Checkouts: This is the number of times that a particular product has been included in a shopping cart at the time that the visitor went to the checkout step.
  • Unique Purchases: This is equivalent to Unique Purchases in the Summary report.
  • Cart-to-Detail Rate: This is equivalent to Cart-to-Detail Rate in the Summary report.
  • Buy-to-Detail Rate: This is equivalent to Buy-to-Detail Rate in the Summary report.

You can see an example of the Shopping Behavior Report in the image below:

In order to have all the columns in this report show data you do need to have eCommerce product events set up. This means that your system tells Google Analytics when someone adds a product to the cart, removes a product from the cart, checks a product out, purchases a product or looks at a single product’s details. If you don’t have all of these set up, it will still show you the numbers for the columns that you do have activated and will show 0 for the columns that aren’t set up.

So for example, if you see the image above, Product Checkouts is not implemented here, but all the other columns have been implemented. The fields that you can or cannot implement will depend on your eCommerce platform and any plugins that you are using, or whether you are manually implementing eCommerce tracking.

So I hope that’s a useful insight into the Product Performance Report. Keep this report in mind when you’re considering adding or subtracting products from your product line, or if you’re wanting to promote more products using PPC or SEO.

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SleepWise Clinic

Petra was instrumental in pulling all our clinic's web analytics into one easy to read, dynamic report that's accessible to me at any time, and works with our EXACT booking system.

This has allowed me to see, at a glance, what marketing initiatives are working, need tweaking, or changing altogether, saving me both time and money. I can't recommend her or her analytic services enough.

Ian Gale SleepWise Clinic Strategy Session August 1, 2018

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