• 1. About this Book
  • 2. 10 Reasons why Ecommerce Businesses Need to Have Google Analytics Set Up Correctly
  • 3. Quick Overview of Your Google Analytics Admin - Before You Set Up Your Ecommerce
  • 4. Setting Up Your “All Web Site Data” View in Google Analytics
  • 5. What the Heck are Parameters... And What do I do with the "Exclude Query Parameters" Field in Google Analytics?
  • 6. Adding Filtered Google Analytics Views Gives You Access to Better Marketing Data
  • 7. Setting up an “Include My Domain” Filter in Google Analytics
  • 8. Using Google Analytics Filters to Rid Yourself of Rage-Inducing Referral Spam
  • 9. Formulating Your IP Address Filter in Google Analytics
  • 10. Ensuring that Your Google Analytics Data is Accurate by Applying Lowercase Filters
  • 11. How to Remove Slashes From The End of your URLs in Google Analytics
  • 12. Fixing the Problem of Parameters in your Ecommerce URLS in Google Analytics
  • 13. Acquiring Your Ecommerce Store’s Unique Parameter List for Google Analytics
  • 14. How to Turn your Ecommerce Parameters into Custom Dimensions in Google Analytics
  • 15. Using your Parameter Custom Dimensions to Discover Ecommerce Opportunities
  • 16. Key Google Analytics Settings You Might Have Overlooked for your Ecommerce Configuration
  • 17. What are the Google Analytics Ecommerce Settings For and How are They Set Up?
  • 18. How to Turn on Ecommerce Tracking in Google Analytics
  • 19. Google Analytics Enhanced Ecommerce on popular Ecommerce Platforms
  • 20. Manually Adding Google Analytics Standard Ecommerce Transaction Tracking Code
  • 21. Manually Adding Google Analytics Enhanced Ecommerce Transaction Tracking Code
  • 22. Implementing Enhanced Ecommerce Features to Collect Game Changing Data For Your Ecommerce Store
  • 23. How Do You Use the Ecommerce Reports Built into Google Analytics?
  • 24. What is the Google Analytics Ecommerce Overview Report and What Should You Use It For?
  • 25. What is the Shopping Behavior Report and What Should You Use It For?
  • 26. The Importance of the Checkout Behavior Report in Google Analytics
  • 27. What is the Product Performance Report Used for in Google Analytics?
  • 28. This post has been deleted
  • 29. How can you see Individual Ecommerce Transactions in Google Analytics?
  • 30. What is the Time to Purchase Report in Google Analytics Used For?
  • 31. Deep-dive your Product Sales with the Google Analytics Product List Report
  • 32. Setting Ecommerce Goals in Google Analytics and Why This is So Important
  • 33. Adding Your Ecommerce Goals to Google Analytics
  • 34. Using Google Analytics Goals to Boost Your Ecommerce Conversion Rate
  • 35. Using the Model Comparison Tool in Google Analytics
  • 36. Segmenting Users - A Powerful Tool for Providing Data Insights
  • 37. Building Segments Using the Shopping Behavior Report
  • 38. How to Use the Segment Builder in Google Analytics
  • 39. How to Build Specific Criteria using Google Analytics' Segment Builder
  • 40. Google Analytics Segment Examples to Enhance Your Ecommerce Sales
  • 41. How to use Segmentation Analysis to Identify Opportunities and Increase Conversion
  • 42. Making the Most of the Demographics of Users When Looking at Ecommerce Data
  • 43. Google Analytics Segmentation Example - Transacted vs Did Not Transact
  • 44. Taking your Segmentation Analysis Further
  • 45. Bonus: Six Reasons Why Your Ecommerce Store Needs Google Tag Manager
  • Petra's Google Ads Agency

    Navigate The Blog

    Archives By Category
    Archives By Date

    Connect With Petra

    Learn From Petra

    Google Analytics Demographics for Ecommerce

    Making the Most of the Demographics of Users When Looking at Ecommerce Data

    Comparing different demographics with each other provides us with far more insight than just looking at Google Analytics users as a single pool. Google Analytics makes this process really easy with the use of segments, ensuring that you can identify and target the demographics that particularly matter to you and your business.

    The image below provides an example of dividing users into three different female segments, the 18-24 year olds, the 25-54 year olds and the 55-64 year olds.

    Looking at these graphs, to  which age group would you want to focus your advertising budget?

    This chart is interesting for several reasons. While the revenue and number of transactions is clearly in favour of the 25-54 year olds (since they are such a large buyer group) the highest conversion rate actually goes to the 55-64 year old women. These older women also had a higher average order value.

    In general for this store, targeting the older women specifically on the website would be a poor move because they do not make up the majority of sales. However, because older women have a higher average spend and a higher conversion rate, you could potentially get more sales by adjusting the bid on any advertising platforms slightly higher for older women. Additionally re-marketing to the older cohort of women after they have been to the website is likely to be money well spent. The higher average order value means that that there is likely to be a higher profit margin on sales to these women, which makes re-marketing to them good value.

    Depending on your business, you might find that you can micro-segment your offer and create satellite websites where you target very small but highly profitable demographics separately. In this case you would want to exclude the niche segment from your advertising to your primary website (so that your satellite website doesn’t compete with your main brand) and then customise your satellite website’s branding and messaging towards serving this niche market separately from the mass market on your primary website.

    Be careful not to be misled by small numbers when comparing demographics. Google Analytics doesn’t maintain demographics data on all of your users and so you are typically only able to find out the demographics of 40-60% of your website traffic. Depending on traffic and conversion numbers this may not be enough for you to draw true conclusions.

    Also if you find that a small segment has a high conversion rate and high average order but these transacting users are all coming directly rather than through your internet marketing, it might be that they are responding to a different advertising medium such as radio, TV or print media and not through your paid online marketing. If this is the case it might not be beneficial at all to increase bids on your advertising to this segment. Always keep an open and curious mind when analysing your users and don’t jump to conclusions too quickly!

    Want to get 8-10X ROAS from Google Ads?