• 1. About this Book
  • 2. 10 Reasons why Ecommerce Businesses Need to Have Google Analytics Set Up Correctly
  • 3. Quick Overview of Your Google Analytics Admin - Before You Set Up Your Ecommerce
  • 4. Setting Up Your “All Web Site Data” View in Google Analytics
  • 5. What the Heck are Parameters... And What do I do with the "Exclude Query Parameters" Field in Google Analytics?
  • 6. Adding Filtered Google Analytics Views Gives You Access to Better Marketing Data
  • 7. Setting up an “Include My Domain” Filter in Google Analytics
  • 8. Using Google Analytics Filters to Rid Yourself of Rage-Inducing Referral Spam
  • 9. Formulating Your IP Address Filter in Google Analytics
  • 10. Ensuring that Your Google Analytics Data is Accurate by Applying Lowercase Filters
  • 11. How to Remove Slashes From The End of your URLs in Google Analytics
  • 12. Fixing the Problem of Parameters in your Ecommerce URLS in Google Analytics
  • 13. Acquiring Your Ecommerce Store’s Unique Parameter List for Google Analytics
  • 14. How to Turn your Ecommerce Parameters into Custom Dimensions in Google Analytics
  • 15. Using your Parameter Custom Dimensions to Discover Ecommerce Opportunities
  • 16. Key Google Analytics Settings You Might Have Overlooked for your Ecommerce Configuration
  • 17. What are the Google Analytics Ecommerce Settings For and How are They Set Up?
  • 18. How to Turn on Ecommerce Tracking in Google Analytics
  • 19. Google Analytics Enhanced Ecommerce on popular Ecommerce Platforms
  • 20. Manually Adding Google Analytics Standard Ecommerce Transaction Tracking Code
  • 21. Manually Adding Google Analytics Enhanced Ecommerce Transaction Tracking Code
  • 22. Implementing Enhanced Ecommerce Features to Collect Game Changing Data For Your Ecommerce Store
  • 23. How Do You Use the Ecommerce Reports Built into Google Analytics?
  • 24. What is the Google Analytics Ecommerce Overview Report and What Should You Use It For?
  • 25. What is the Shopping Behavior Report and What Should You Use It For?
  • 26. The Importance of the Checkout Behavior Report in Google Analytics
  • 27. What is the Product Performance Report Used for in Google Analytics?
  • 28. This post has been deleted
  • 29. How can you see Individual Ecommerce Transactions in Google Analytics?
  • 30. What is the Time to Purchase Report in Google Analytics Used For?
  • 31. Deep-dive your Product Sales with the Google Analytics Product List Report
  • 32. Setting Ecommerce Goals in Google Analytics and Why This is So Important
  • 33. Adding Your Ecommerce Goals to Google Analytics
  • 34. Using Google Analytics Goals to Boost Your Ecommerce Conversion Rate
  • 35. Using the Model Comparison Tool in Google Analytics
  • 36. Segmenting Users - A Powerful Tool for Providing Data Insights
  • 37. Building Segments Using the Shopping Behavior Report
  • 38. How to Use the Segment Builder in Google Analytics
  • 39. How to Build Specific Criteria using Google Analytics' Segment Builder
  • 40. Google Analytics Segment Examples to Enhance Your Ecommerce Sales
  • 41. How to use Segmentation Analysis to Identify Opportunities and Increase Conversion
  • 42. Making the Most of the Demographics of Users When Looking at Ecommerce Data
  • 43. Google Analytics Segmentation Example - Transacted vs Did Not Transact
  • 44. Taking your Segmentation Analysis Further
  • 45. Bonus: Six Reasons Why Your Ecommerce Store Needs Google Tag Manager
  • Petra's Google Ads Agency

    Navigate The Blog

    Archives By Category
    Archives By Date

    Connect With Petra

    Learn From Petra

    IP Address Filter Google Analytics

    Formulating Your IP Address Filter in Google Analytics

    IP addresses identify groups of users, and this is something that can actually impact significantly on your eCommerce operation. The case for using IP address filters is that you want to filter out your own business’ IP addresses, and the IP addresses of your suppliers such as writers, analysts, marketers and website developers. While it may not immediately occur to the average online business owner, it is definitely worthwhile to make the most of the IP Address Filter contained within Google Analytics.

    What’s the reason for this? Well, if your staff members or contractors are visiting your website to work with it or answer customer enquiries, they could be inadvertantly mucking up your data. Some unethical marketing companies might even be visiting your website to make you think you’re getting more traffic (don’t get me wrong – most marketing companies are great, but it has happened).

    Adding an IP address filter prevents test transactions and other staff interactions from showing up in your filtered data, which could make your data inaccurate. Obviously this is something you’re going to want to avoid.

    While this might seem like a marginal issue, it is surprising how often it can crop up in the real world. Let me give you an example.

    I had a client who did not have an IP Address filter set up when they tested their eCommerce settings. They ran some test transactions, and discovered there was an error in their eCommerce settings.This error caused the transaction price for each sale to be listed as $100,000.00.

    They made 21 test transactions before they worked out what was going on, and by that stage they were already up to over $2 million in recorded sales in their production analytics account, even though their actual products were only selling for around $30 each. I’m sure you can see that this data was fairly useless!

    It is worth nothing that if your business doesn’t have a fixed IP address you can still filter your own IP address before you spend any significant time on your website.

    If you go to Google and type in “What is my IP address” (as shown below) then Google will reveal your IP address to you.

    If your IP address isn’t fixed then it has the possibility to change in the future, so you’d want to check the filter each time you spend time on the website. Most ISPs will fix your IP address for a nominal fee if you request this, which does make the process somewhat easier. Companies with their own IT team and hardware can usually have a range of IP addresses allocated for all staff. If you have an IT team, ask them what your public IP addresses are.

    If you want to exclude (or include) several IP addresses at the same time it is a good idea to use a regular expression to include them all in the same filter.

    By ensuring that your IP Address Filter is formulated correctly you are setting your eCommerce business up for success, and ensuring that you don’t generate the sort of crazy data that my client had to cope with.

    Want to get 8-10X ROAS from Google Ads?