Having and using your eCommerce data in Google Analytics is super useful! However, before your Google Analytics account can read eCommerce data you need to turn on eCommerce tracking.

You need to turn on Ecommerce Settings for each view that you want to include eCommerce data, like this:

And then flick Enable Ecommerce to ‘ON’.

You may also wish to turn on the setting Enable Related Products. This is a new setting that can help you to see which product purchases are associated with other product purchases.

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Now click Next Step.

In the next step, you choose whether you will use Standard Ecommerce or Enhanced Ecommerce. In the last article I discussed the differences between the two. If you are not sure which framework your website uses then you can find out by making a test transaction on your website, and looking at the structure of the Google Analytics tracking code in your source code (that’s the nerdy way). Or alternatively you can ask your website developer.

If you choose to turn Enhanced Ecommerce on then you can optionally use checkout labelling to name discrete steps in your checkout process.

Checkout Labelling isn’t commonly used by eCommerce platforms yet, so is only likely to be relevant if you have a custom-developed website with enhanced eCommerce tracking enabled, and you have manually set up funnel steps in your tracking code. The purpose of this feature is to determine your funnel abandonment rate at each checkout step.

Next click Submit. This completes the process.

Once we have Ecommerce turned on in Google Analytics, eCommerce data will begin feeding through if we have set it up correctly. You may need to wait up to 48 hours after turning it on before seeing data, as it takes time for Google Analytics Ecommerce servers to become activated for your account.

Your eCommerce settings are ready when Google Analytics allows you to click on Ecommerce Reports in the Conversions menu.

Important Note: If you wait 48 hours and there is no data showing up in your Google Analytics Ecommerce reports then your website’s eCommerce tracking code will need to be looked at. For eCommerce data to come through into Google Analytics, your website needs to contain tracking code that meets the requirements of either of the Google Analytics Standard or Enhanced Ecommerce tracking frameworks.

Depending on how your tracking code has been written, you may also require Google Tag Manager to intercept and/or forward on your eCommerce data to Google Analytics.

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Petra was instrumental in pulling all our clinic's web analytics into one easy to read, dynamic report that's accessible to me at any time, and works with our EXACT booking system.

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